Nanotheranostics 2021; 5(4):431-444. doi:10.7150/ntno.55165

Research Paper

Tracking adoptive T cell immunotherapy using magnetic particle imaging

Angelie Rivera-Rodriguez1, Lan B. Hoang-Minh2,3, Andreina Chiu-Lam4, Nicole Sarna1, Leyda Marrero-Morales1, Duane A. Mitchell2,3,5, Carlos M. Rinaldi-Ramos1,4,5✉

1. J Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.
2. Preston A. Wells, Jr. Center for Brain Tumor Therapy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.
3. Lillian S. Wells Department of Neurosurgery, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.
4. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.
5. UF Health Cancer Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA.

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Citation:
Rivera-Rodriguez A, Hoang-Minh LB, Chiu-Lam A, Sarna N, Marrero-Morales L, Mitchell DA, Rinaldi-Ramos CM. Tracking adoptive T cell immunotherapy using magnetic particle imaging. Nanotheranostics 2021; 5(4):431-444. doi:10.7150/ntno.55165. Available from https://www.ntno.org/v05p0431.htm

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Abstract

Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a potent strategy to boost the immune response against cancer. ACT is effective against blood cancers but faces challenges in treating solid tumors. A critical step for the success of ACT immunotherapy is to achieve efficient trafficking and persistence of T cells to solid tumors. Non-invasive tracking of the accumulation of adoptively transferred T cells to tumors would greatly accelerate development of more effective ACT strategies. We demonstrate the use of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) to non-invasively track ACT T cells in vivo in a mouse model of brain cancer. Magnetic labeling did not impair primary tumor-specific T cells in vitro, and MPI allowed the detection of labeled T cells in the brain after intravenous or intracerebroventricular administration. These results support the use of MPI to track adoptively transferred T cells and accelerate the development of ACT treatments for brain tumors and other cancers.

Keywords: biomedical imaging, brain cancer, cell labeling, cellular therapy, iron oxide nanoparticles